Practical Finishes By Jeff Conti

practical-finishes-22-july-07-jeff-conti

By Jeff Conti

22 July 2007

Topics: Shellac, Behlen’s Woodturner Finish, Wax (Renaissance and Liberon), Penetrating oils (Danish oil, Boiled Linseed oil and Teak oil) Butcher Block OIL, Walnut Oil, Hard Cellulose Nitrate Lacquer (Deft)

Shellac comes from the excretions of the lac insect Kerria lacca, found in the forests of Assam and Thailand (Wikipedia).

Shellac can be purchased in two basic forms, commercially mixed in a can with other chemicals and natural flakes that you dilute into denatured alcohol. Both of these forms have variations you can buy for effects you are looking for.

I suggest blond (no wax) Shellac flakes for the following reasons… You can read the rest of the article here – practical-finishes-22-july-07-jeff-conti

A Story in Every Turning

I was recently explaining the markings on the bottom of a highly figured spalted maple bowl with stone inlay to a coworker who remarked that I had a story for each piece that he had seen me turn. That is when I had one of those wow moments to which I stated that I probably had at least a half a dozen for each piece that I had ever turned, some pieces have even more.

When you consider all the steps that go into turning an item worthy of display it should not be a surprise to me that many of lifeʼs little stories would become imbedded in that bowl. Stories like, where did you get the wood? Buy it or get it free? Cut it green or starting to punk out? What shape. Where did it go? What tool to use? Is it sharp? What cut? How much? How thin? What shape now? What finish? Who is it for? What piece is next?

If you have a favorite story about a piece of wood, and your journey with it into a turned item and on, let me know.

*you can read more in the June 2008 Newsletter

A Story in Every Turning

I was recently explaining the markings on the bottom of a highly figured spalted maple bowl with
stone inlay to a coworker who remarked that I had a story for each piece that he had seen me turn. That is when I had one of those wow moments to which I stated that I probably had at least a half a dozen for each piece that I had ever turned, some pieces have even more.

When you consider all the steps that go into turning an item worthy of display it should not be a surprise to me that many of lifeʼs little stories would become imbedded in that bowl. Stories like, where did you get the wood? Buy it or get it free? Cut it green or starting to punk out? What shape. Where did it go? What tool to use? Is it sharp? What cut? How much? How thin? What shape now? What finish? Who is it for? What piece is next?

If you have a favorite story about a piece of wood, and your journey with it into a turned item and on, let me know.

*you can read the rest of this in the June 2008 Newsletter.

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